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My goal is sharing Beauty

My goal is sharing Beauty

* DSC_0107 Red White Rose blossom

To find posts on any particular aspects of beauty I’ve shared, just click on the categories or tags that interest you on the right.
Often you can enlarge a picture by clicking on it. Some photos, when you click on them (like the Rose above) take awhile to load because they are big files. Be patient. Enjoy Beauty!

My photos and poems are copyrighted, but the purpose of this blog is to share beauty. Because of this I’ve made it possible to download any of my photos by right clicking them and saving them to your disk. Feel free to download them and make prints or use them on your computer for personal use only . All I ask is that you let me know that you liked them and have downloaded them by emailing me at drdanwindisch@gmail.com or drdanw@comcast.net. That will make my day!

If you want to use any photo or poem for commercial use, or for use by a non-profit you will need my permission. Please email me at drdanwindisch@gmail.com or drdanw@comcast.net requesting that permission.

Many of my original photos have much larger original files and will not blow up to large sizes well from the downloads from this blog. If you need these larger files you can again email me at drdanwindisch@gmail.com or drdanw@comcast.net .

Enjoy! There is so much beauty in the world!

 

Beauty in the photographs details: Lily B&W

Below is the original photograph, and the final edited photograph of the lily.

I wanted to emphasize the gorgeous nature of the Lily, eliminate the distraction of the background, eliminate the orange of the stigma, and make the background black. What remains is the awe-inspiring shapes, curves, and texture of this amazing flower!

Beauty in the photographs details: Hollyhock Chair Boat

There is so much in this photograph that I love.

The place itself I love. It is the Hollyhock Retreat center on Cortes Island in British Columbia, a beautiful, remote, and Magical, Transformative place, especially in the summertime. I first went there in 1978 And attended a 13 week long Resident fellow program with a different workshop each week. I attended a dream workshop where I learned that I was Dan, Dan, The rainbow man, a healer and a teacher. And for the last 45 years, I’ve lived being a Healer and a teacher. I learned about Quan Yen (or Kuan Yin),The bodhisattva of compassion. I learned it from John Blofeld, that Very British China convert, Who wrote so beautifully about Quan Yen (or Kuan Yin), and also  translated the I Ching. John Blofeld so enjoyed his afternoon tea :). I learned about the I Ching, and Tarot cards. And I learned from the wind, the trees, low and high tides, I learned from the lapping of the water, BJ, Whiskey and orange juice, early morning sunshine, the wonderful gardens, and even more wonderful vegetarian meals. I learned by working with Bill Glackman, now a lifetime friend, doing handyman work around the then COld Mountain Institute.

But what do I love about this picture! I love the early morning light, with the side-light and long shadows. I love the empty chair and the empty boat, both waiting for us/me/you.

I can feel myself sitting in that chair, with my eyes closed, warm, with the sunshine on my face and arms in the cool morning, and ever so gently, I feel a slight breeze. With each breath, I breathe in the light, salty smells of the sea. I hear the gentle lapping of water on the beach. I hear the bird calls of morning,  welcoming the new day. That chair is a place to simply be, mindfully and appreciatively.

The empty boat, red and white and waiting, Is not about mindfulness. The empty boat is about adventure awaiting! Come,Let us row away to adventure! Morning is the time for both contemplation and beginning of adventures! I love that in this photograph.

I love the colors, the greens of the grass and the tree. I love the shades of blues in the sea, and in the mountains across the sea.  I love the bands of lighter color blue on the water.

I love how small I am in that early morning light, And how big that quiet sea is,  and how the shrouded mountains are at the top the photograph.

I love the lines of the small waves, lapping towards the shore.

I love the juxtaposition of the living Green tree, the stump, and the wooden chair. Three stages of existence?

I love the variations between the rocky shore, The tidal zone with it’s small rocks and mud , and the two big rocks In the nearby shallow water.

When I look at this picture, I feel gratitude, the hopes of a new morning, The beckoning of mindfulness and adventure, and the sheer beauty of it all: colors, bands of blue and green, and waves, sea, trees, shore, chair, boat, and distant mountains… and ME!

Dan’s “Images of Peace” art show at St. Placids in Lacey May 19 7-930pm

Below are my photos that I will be sharing and selling at  the “Images of Peace” Art Show at St. Placid Priory in Lacey, WA on May 19 7-930pm.

Tickets are available at: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2906826

I find that these photos bring me a sense of peace, and I hope that they also do that for you!

Dan

Our first daffodil of Spring 2017

Our first daffodil of Spring! It reminds me of the quote from one of my favorite movies, “City of Angels” where Nicolas Cage reads the following from Hemingway. Cycles, and even pain, end, as flowers bloom once again.

“You expected to be sad in the fall. Part of you died each year when the leaves fell from the trees and their branches were bare against the wind and the cold, wintery light. But you knew there would always be the spring, as you knew the river would flow again after it was frozen.”
― Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Access and sharing of Beauty: 1970 IBM 360 versus the Iphone 6s Plus

I’ve been thinking about the amazing ingenuity and creativity in the area of computing since 1970 that makes access to, and the development of, beauty possible. In Spring quarter 1970 I took a computer programming class using Fortran. I now have an iPhone 6S Plus. Below are the comparisons  between the two machines That I collected online from Wikipedia. The differences in computing are  amazing!

The IBM 360 required Punch Cards for each line of code. If you made a mistake you would have to retype each punch card with a mistake on it.  I would submit my stack of punch cards in the morning, and pick up a printout in the afternoon. Usually there were mistakes in my coding, and I’d have to redo my punch cards again and submit again. The programming was only in Fortran.  There was no other input or output available to me as a student.

Wow, what a difference now! my iPhone, that fits in the palm of my hand,  is 111 times as fast is that  IBM 360, and has 16000 times the storage. The IBM 360 cost $253,000 in 1970; My iphone cost $750 in 2015. The Iphone has voice recognition, fingerprint recognition, Multi-touch touchscreen display, triple microphone, Apple M8 motion coprocessor, 3-axis gyroscope, 3-axis accelerometer, digitalcompass, iBeacon, proximity sensor, ambient light sensor, Touch ID fingerprint reader, barometer (from Wikipedia 2/20/17) 2 cameras, internet, and email. I also can dictate and have it converted to text files.

I can, and do, access  great art from museums around the world  and other places on the internet. I also can share my blog, my art, and my writing and poetry, which is immediately accessible to anyone with internet access anywhere in the world.

I only wish that the ingenuity and creativity  could have helped us become more compassionate and appreciative  and supportive of each other as humans and sentient beings on this amazingly beautiful planet Earth.

 

  IBM 360 (1969) at Western Washington University My IPhone 6 Plus 2016
cost $253,000. For a typical system $750
input IBM punch cards, tape Multi-touch touchscreen display, triple microphone, Apple M8 motion coprocessor, 3-axis gyroscope, 3-axis accelerometer, digitalcompass, iBeacon, proximity sensor, ambient light sensor, Touch ID fingerprint reader, barometer (from Wikipedia 2/20/17)

2 cameras, internet, email, also can dictate and have it converted to text

Speed of cpu The 1967 IBM System/360 Model 91 could do up to 16.6 MB instructions per second.[4] (from Wikipedia 2/20/17) 1.85 GHz dual-core 64-bit ARMv8-A[2][3] “Twister”

(My iphone is 111 times as fast as the IBM 360!)

Space and weight Took up a whole floor of a building at WWU and weighed 6.8 ounces, fits in the  palm of my hand
storage up to 8 MB of main memory … 512 KB, 768 KB or 1024 KB was more common (from Wikipedia 2/20/17) 128 gb (the iphone has 16,000 times the storage that the IBM 360!)
output Line printer Screen, telephone, internet, email, social media, photos, videos

 

Beauty in the photographs details:Teapots

I love this photo! 

I love this photo and put a lot of work into it. I wanted to emphasize the teapots, the linen, the reflections, and therefore made everything but the table and the teapots into a black background.

What do I love in this photograph?

The T shape folded white tablecloth and the detailed weaving of that tablecloth.

The white teapot in the foreground, with its beautiful curved elegant handle shaped perfectly for pouring. The gentle curved classy but deliberately understated spout, that white 5 petaled rose on the knob of the cover, and that so wonderfully curved reflection of light on top. I love the reflection of the trees of the garden and the afternoon sun on the front of the teapot. That teapot is elegant perfection in the service of tea! Yet, we often don’t see it. Thinking about something else, we just pour our tea.

The blue handled, blue spouted, Blue topped, colorful teapot in the background. I love the colors, the flowers, the orange with yellow dotted bottom. I love the shape of the handle and the tear drop shaped top handle. I love the bright light and shadow of the afternoon sun on the teapot. I love the shape and The light and  the shadows of the blue handle against the black background.

I love the light of the sun and the shapes it makes on the tablecloth at the top of the photo.

I love how the teapots in their simple elegant beauty, and the tablecloth, and the sunlight on the tablecloth are the stars of this photograph. Yet, the tea cup and the plate with the scone almost hidden at the top are also part of the photograph.

For me, this is almost a perfect photograph that brings me great joy, and great remembrances of the teahouse in Victoria British Columbia.

68th Birthday and the Joy Grandchildren bring

Today is my 68th Birthday, and although I love teaching, one of my greatest joys is spending time with grandchildren, seeing them grow, and watching their joy and wonder in the world! Lincoln’s absolute awe at the beauty of the bubbles, and Grayson and Dallas so much enjoying the making of bubbles, makes me very happy.

 Also feeding Baby Parks as Tyler and Dallas look on, and the warmth and smell of a baby, are truly times of great contentment.

Beauty in the photographs details 1: Appreciating Panama Canal Photo

Knowing what to look for, and what the photographer saw in the photo, adds to the appreciation of the photograph. Below is a photo as we were in the Gatun locks in the Panama Canal in December 2016. What I love are the details, the woman alone on the deck observing, the very small space between the ship and the edge of the canal, the workmen looking up, the lines of the rails, the lighthouse. Each are such a small part of the photo, yet so important, even in their smallness, Each detail adds to the appreciation of this photo.

Even though it is not a “great” photo, knowing the details adds so much. Hope you appreciate the photo of this engineering feat, where people are small, and lines and shapes dominate, as viewed from a cruise ship. In the final photo I cut out the lighthouse to emphasize the smallness of the people, the lines, and include the picnic table.

Panama Canal Gatun Locks and Lake

These photos document the 3 locks used to raise ships 85 feet up to Gatun Lake. As we rose the lake regally came into view!

It is such an amazing mankind accomplishment, and something I enjoyed while having breakfast on a cruise ship 🙂

Crossing the Panama Canal was a major bucket item list that I was able to finally accomplish on our South America cruise in December 2016!

A great documentary is available that I would highly recommend on youtube and is well worth watching!

The Making of the Amazingly beautiful Panama Hats in Manta Ecuador

One of the most fascinating things we saw on our South American cruise during SMU’s 2016 Christmas break was the demonstration of the making of “Panama” hats, which actually originate in Ecuador. The intricacy and craftsmanship that go into the making of these hats is amazing. I’m pleased to have recorded onto film, and edited with Lightroom, this most beautiful work. Below is information from Wikipedia dated 1/2/17.

“the traditional Ecuadorian toquilla hat was added to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists on 6 December 2012. In 1904, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt visited the construction site of the Panama Canal, and was photographed wearing a panama hat, which further increased the hats’ popularity. The best quality hats are known as Montecristis, after the town of Montecristi, where they are produced. The Montecristi Foundation has established a grading system based on a figure called the Montecristi Cuenta, calculated by measuring the horizontal and vertical rows of weave per inch. The rarest and most expensive panama hats are hand-woven with up to 3000 weaves per square inch. In February 2014, Simon Espinal, an Ecuadorian 47-year-old panama hat weaver considered to be among the best at his craft, set a world record by creating a panama hat with four thousand weaves per inch that took eight months to handcraft from beginning to end. According to popular lore, a “superfino” panama hat can hold water and, when rolled up, pass through a wedding ring.  Although the panama hat continues to provide a livelihood for thousands of Ecuadorians, fewer than a dozen weavers capable of making the finest “Montecristi superfinos” remain. Production in Ecuador is dwindling, due to economic problems in Ecuador and competition from Chinese hat producers.

 

Wikipedia